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in changing religious laws in america, i guess? >> guest: well, the salvation army, which people don't realize, is an evangelical religious group, not just a group that rings bells outside department stores in the christmas season. the salvation army believed in what they called the cathedral of the open air and would go into areas, especially impoverished areas, and have parades and make lots of noise with brass bands and cymbals, and loud preaching trying to attract, especially the urban poor, back into religious life. this came up against requirements of many cities that any parade be permitted, and the salvation army made it a practice not to apply for permits, and to be arrested, often playing instruments into the way into the cell, and challenges laws as anti-religious, and they won and lost a lot of them. they destabilized the law of the states by challenging these restrictions, and they never really made it to the supreme court of the united states, though, because the states were still in power. >> host: professor gordon, when did the first major religious case come before the supreme
at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by the way. >> that by the way is how the chinese would describe any relationship between japan and america. the interesting aspect of all these conflicts is that as india and china and india and china have a proximate geographically, but we've never been neighbors. >> right. >> in order to be neighbors you either have to love each other or hate each other. we have done neither. in fact, in 1962 during the first strategic conflict, between these two, you have to understand, it's hard to understand why we are not neighbors. [inaudible] in terms of inaccessible. but the positions, the lines, the strategies, the lines, what would they resonate to? the positions that are taken by postcolonial nations is that we will not be bound by decisions made by colonial powers. one, or in china's case, that we had to abandon our national positions. and now that we are strong, we need to resurrect them. right or wrong is not, that is very little to do w
in asia and africa and the americas or do you basically surrender to decline? and i think that requires very tough choices about the time and energy and education systems and welfare systems and being not prepared to tolerate poor performance. >> rose: and rick stengel, managing editor of "time" magazine talking about "time" magazine's person of the year. >> i always like to feel the person who wins person of the year it's both backward looking in terms of the year past and forward looking in terms of what that person will do in the next year and beyond and obama is a perfect example of that. the next america is the america of today. which is why in effect he's person of the year. because he's the architect of this new america and i actually think it's a great thing because it's a more tolerant america, a more diverse america. >> rose: osborne and stengel. next. caioning spoored by roseommunications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continu
the national rifle association. we will host a debate on gun control between the gun honors for america and the coalition to stop gun violence. then we will speak to paul barrett, author of, "glock: the rise of america's gun." and we will get a report from the streets of cairo from sharif abdel kouddous. >> of voting among the division. egyptians headed to the polls on saturday in the sixth national election in nearly two years. this time, to vote on a referendum and a hotly disputed constitution. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. president obama has vowed to take action against gun violence in the united states following the shooting rampage that left 27 people dead, including 20 young children, in newtown, connecticut. all of the children are aged 6 and 7. the gunman, 20-year-old adam lanza, shot his mother dead at their home before driving to the sandy hook elementary school and forcing his way inside. armed with high-powered rifle, two handguns and hundreds of rounds of ammunition, lanza shot up
america is the america of today. which is why in effect he's person of the year. because he's the architect of this new america and i actually think it's a great thing because it's a more tolerant america, a more diverse america. >> rose: osborne and stengel. next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continues to lead the increasingly controversial austerity process. in a piece called "god sieve the british economy" in the upcoming "new york times" magazine adam davidson writes "in the past two years the united states has experienced a steep downturn followed by steady though horrendously slow upturn. the british economy, however, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a
by securing america's future energy, this is about an hour-and-a-half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the energy security leadership council for being with us today. they have been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we are nothing without their credibility as the great ceo's, an entrepreneur, and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special>> i want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. we stand on the shoulders and the time it takes to get these reports. the policy staff, james, leslie, the staff that puts these together, our political staff and the rest of the team at safe. we're seeing more production than we have ever seen before. the most production in the last couple of decades of year on year growth. oil imports are falling. the demand for oil continues to decline based on fuel economy standards and other reasons. we still continue to have a problem. the report we are releasing today and the subtitle says it all. harnessing american resour
that -- formula ever in the history of america -- economics that more american energy equals more american jobs, i don't know what it is. it is all the jobs you have if you of a reliable supply of energy. the front page of the "the wall street journal" indicates a difficulty of connecting this cheap product we have in natural gas. we thought we would run out natural-gas as a country. connecting this cheap product with a more expensive market and getting it overseas. if we could become energy self- sufficient, that does not mean we would not buy on the world market, but if we could meet our needs in the north american markets, almost all of that money comes back to us. we have no better trading partner than canada. nafta has increased the trading capacity of mexico. it has gone somewhere from the 40% range and a growing and, -- 57 neighborhood to the high 40's to the mid-70s's now, and they are quickly catching up with canada. when you buy energy in north america, they give you the money back. that was a lot to solve the problems. if you make your position better as a nation, suddenly, your numbers
me. announcer: play a role in ending hunger. visit feedingamerica.org/hunger and find your local food bank. $82 bi lou: foreign buyers are helping to boost our housing msarket. those buyers accounted for billn $82 billion in home sales over the past year. 9 billion of those dollarschines coming from th chinese. t second only to those canadians, as the largest one homebuyers in presidenntry. the io and president ofao citimortgage, he is joining us the ov let's start with the overaller robustness come to power of thit recovery. is it too strong of a language to join these concepts?18 out o >> the housing is recovering on a sustained basis. eighteen out of 20 top cities are now showing growth. [inaudible] lou: what do you think? lo >> the general view is if you look at long-term trends fromne, 1968 onward, you know that there was a bubble in the 2006 and wei 2007 time.the general vi the general view is that it will take a while to get their. lou: so someone is looking at am profit and they might eagerlyrah jumper t at that rather than wat for a full gross? >> that is the general deal. th
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to reduce gun violence in america. so what that might be is a mystery. we'll tell what you has worked in some other countries. >> she was the type of person that could just light up a room. she is an incredible person and i'm so blessed to be her dad. >> american children are 13 times more likely to be murdered here than in other developed nations. why? we will try to answer that question. >> hiding behind the second amendment doesn't cut it anymore. it's time our lawmakers realize that society has changed. >> it took just minutes for some far left pundits to exploit the terrible murders in connecticut for political purposes. bernie goldberg will have thoughts on that. caution. you are about to enter the no spin zone. "the factor" begins right now. >> hi. i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. what do we do, what do we do about violent evil? that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. having done extensive research on lee harvey oswald for "killing kennedy," i snow something about violent evil i. saw it firsthand in el salvador and the middle east and i sat
evangelicals because they saw him as such a strong and courageous leader and america's mayor. i think that there is room for that. i think those two candidates that you mentioned -- it wasn't so much their position on abortion or being pro-life per se. it was one had a much more extreme position and the other one was just sort of medieval. he had this really bizarre idea about women. i don't even want to get into it. it was ridiculous. and as you saw, the gop absolutely denounced his views on that. >> let me very quickly let maria weigh in here and give you the final word. >> well, so i agree with amy that the gop should get credit for the diversity that they have in governorships, but it's not enough. because leadership positions do actually happen to be very important in congress where you actually pass bills that are going to affect what the changing demographics of america. so until the gop understands that and until they deal with the agenda as well, not just on immigration but on women's issues and economic issues as well, they're going to have to change their symbol from the el
than ever before. >> rose: you're bullish on america? >> i think on the energy side for sure. and i'd say on the -- the one thing that never goes away in the united states is the incredible accept of entrepreneurs. so i think if we can get a set of great entrepreneurs, we can go after some big opportunities like energy. there's no reason why the united states can't continue to grow. >> rose: can manufacturing come back to america? >> if you looked -- i'm 30 year g.e. guy. so when i started it was probably 25% of american jobs were manufacturing, now it's 9%. so it is going to go back to be 25% again? probably not. could it be in the low teens? yes. >> rose: apple just announced today -- >> i saw that. i saw what tim did. we brought jobs back to the united states. i think american work force is very productive. i think in the sets of technologies that we make today you can make them here. i actually think that the relationships in general between unions and business and things like that have all progressed over time and the work force is very productive. so there's no reason why the
that america needs to go back to work. it's just a matter of having the will to do it, the programs are out there. compromise can be made around the streamlining of regulations to make sure that we are putting people back to work. if chris christy and barack obama can get -- chris cristie and barack obama can get together on that, and i know what's transpired and how the impact of our infrastructure has taken place along the eastern seaboard, it's something we ought to be able to rally around immediately. and of course everyone, everyone deserves a $250,000 tax break. we all agree on that. so why not just simply adopt it and then come back and we'll have time to address the issues as it relates to bending the cost curve on health care and focusing on the vast inefficiencies, the fraud, the abuse and the waste that totals more than $750 billion annually? as for the chairman from my district said, list, it would be a way for us to bring down the deficit but also make health care affordable, accessible and functional for the american people. something i believe we must do. with that let me int
. >> reporter: in most of america, u.p.s. drivers spend a lot of time behind the wheel. not tony. he parks his truck less than two miles away for the whole day. >> i prefer to park and uh let my legs do the work, you know what i mean? >> reporter: today, tony is lucky to have the help of angel tirado, a seasonal worker. so, it's angel who delivers dozens of heavy boxes to a garment warehouse. meanwhile, tony minds the truck and gets ready for the next delivery, offering up some tips of the trade: like the importance of making friends in the buildings. >> at least once a week, every one of my freight guys, they're going to get a coffee from me. once in a while, you know, i'll go get like a couple of sandwiches. i mean, they make my life a whole lot easier. i want them liking me! >> reporter: after a while, i persuade tony to let me deliver two packages to a building across the street. that means, i'm also responsible for the diad-- the electronic clipboard tracking all the packages. i have two packages for you. >> great. >> reporter: and i need you to sign. with that, my visit is over. but tony
coming up after 2:00 p.m. >>> one of the biggest gun retailers in america says it did a lot of soul searching after the newtown massacre. but in the end, customers wanted guns. >>> in the 3:00 hour, we'll take a closer look at how other countries view america's fascination with guns including japan where almost no one owns firearms. >>> and it's that time of the year when everyone gets sick. at 4:00 p.m., doctor sanjay gupta will explain how to avoid getting the flu. your money starts right now. >>> just days to go before america goes over a fiscal cliff. an outcome looking more likely every hour. washington's willingness to take america to the brink threatens its prosperity. i'm ali velshi. this is "your money." the latest negotiations comes down to useless symbolic moves and haggling between grown men. put bluntly, your elected officials are wasting time while the clock ticks. house speaker john boehner announced his plan b to let bush-era tax cuts expire for earners making more than a million dollars a year. and he wants to replace automatic cuts in defense spending set to start
and taking risk, about inspiring others no matter the odds. that is what america is at its best. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> obama to boehner, get serious. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. the republicans have their plan, and it's great news for the rich. speaker john boehner just put it out. those at the top, the 2%, are safe. your bush tax cuts are going to keep on giving. one problem, mr. boehner, you lost. that was your position before the election, and you lost. mitt romney campaigned on keeping the tax cuts for the wealthy, and he lost. and he promised to do what john boehner is doing right now, and he lost. how about some respect for the electorate? how about seeing what the 2012 presidential debate was about? obama championed tax fairness and won. republicans championed protecting that 2%, ignoring the 47% he talked about, and they lost. today boehner said he's willing to raise revenues by the same amount he agreed to back in august of 2011, the last time they
of the warm weather in america, but on calvin klein, that's the one i think you ought to look at. got to come in, warm weather is going to cause everybody to have jitters. i wish we could forget about politics. until we get a deal, it's bad news for themarket. even for cheap stock like apple. "mad money" will be right back. >>> tonight, two companies with break through products that are leading the charge. cramer is talking to the ceos of immunojet and seattle genetics, just ahead. and later, reenergized in pipelines, they're america's energy toll road and they can provide investors with a secure source of dividends, but his investment in north dakota's oil rich back and shale continues, cramer's looking for companies that are looking to expand. all coming up on "mad money." well, if it isn't mr. margin. mr. margin? don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way.
on the buy american program. we wholeheartedly agree with and encouraged by america, manufacturing created in the united states, and to continue to grow our nation's economy in that way. at we are in a transitional period and we've had some challenges in trying to get waivers for as much as five months on a cliff for a real-time. that probably shouldn't have taken that long as we're in this transitional period. so figuring out how to accommodate the goal by america but finding a way to get there in a transition period i think would be good. i know i'm out of time, or to enclose. i would just suggest that as we move to paris of we would love to see this program continue. we do know that there are prioritization based investments that should and could be made. performance based investments are the way of the future. we're committed to it in washington state. we support that and we think that taxpayers should continue to see the benefits for the dollars invested. but we also believe that passenger rail is where its advocates were our future needs to go and we appreciate the vision of the pres
to the people who live in the united states of america. why? because we share the same values, the same principles, the same heritage and the same enemies. because we are in the middle east today, dean attacked we ask ourselves why these people against the jewish nation in the middle east. not because of the lens we so-called occupied. it is the value we are working upon them in israel and the values of our democracy following very carefully their election here in the united states and beginning to be interesting. but we do father and we do to the american people and the american values. sometimes too much. for example today of independence in israel, a big celebration you'll find people in the israeli flag and the american flag. i don't like it. i put on my car only the israeli flag. why do people do with? to democracy and values of the american people. one of my main point in my book is israel is not america. even though we love america, we are not america and we cannot make mistakes because if you make a mistake, you pay a price, but you are able to correct it. if israel makes the mi
:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy says the greatest threat to national and economic security is dependence on foreign oil. members of the group, business political and retired military leaders are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production, reducing consumption, and improving conservation as a way to boost revenue and reduce our debt. this is a little less than an hour and a half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the leadership council that could be with us here today. they've been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we're nothing without their credibility as the great c.e.o.'s, entrepreneurs and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. really we stand on their shoulders, all of us, and the hard work that they -- and the time that they spent to put these reports in conjunction with the energy security leadership council, the policy staff, jonna hamilton, jame
who serve with them. tragic for america. lou: and the part that you said where it is tragic foru: us us. in our various institutions, since there are no consequences. sitting in an aircraft, we have a pretty strong light, and this actually the architect and the guy who presided over the largest conflict in american history, a conflict we have not won. >> to his credit, we have to give general petraeus credit. he is paid a price, nobody comes a general without slipping up to the top. i have extraordinary respect for these folks. lou: you say these folks. no one respects for supports more or military than i do. if you will, i will not indulge the plural. i'm talking about a man who sent the cia down the gutter. >> i will not defend what he did, you can't. lou: why don't we try to get to what is going on. why are we putting up with this kind of nonsense and recognizing there is a culture the military and in washington that we have to get a hold of. >> i think it is a culture all over our society. look at the sports world. virtually no part of our culture in which people don't feel they
office, i believe america only succeeds and thrives when we got a strong and growing middle class. that's what i believe. i believe we're at our best when everybody who works hard has a chance to get ahead. that they can get a job that pays the bills. that they got health care they can count on. that they can retire with dignity and respect. maybe take a vacation once and a while. nothing fancy. you know, just -- just being able to pack up the kids and go some place and enjoy time with people that you love. make sure that your kids can go to a good school. make sure they can aspire to be whatever they want to be. that idea is what built america. that's the idea that built michigan. that's the idea that is at the heart of the economic plan i've been talking about all year long on the campaign trail. i want to give more americans the chance to earn the skills, the businesses they're looking for right now. and give our kids the kind of education they need to succeed in the 21st century. i want to make sure america leads the world in research and technology, and clean energy. i want to put
in america, but after they bought calvin klein, that's the one i think you ought to look at. let it come in, warm weather is going to cause everybody to have jitters. i wish we could forget about politics. i'd love to discuss decker's or coach. until we get a deal, it's bad news for the market. even for cheap stock like apple. "mad money" will be right back. >>> high on biotech. medical innovations continue to help us. tonight, two companies with breakthrough products that are leading the charge. cramer is talking to the ceos of immunogen and seattle genetics, just ahead. and later, reenergized. pipelines, they're america's energy toll road and can provide investors with a secure source of dividends, but his investment in north dakota's oil rich bakken shale continues, cramer's looking for companies that are ready to expand. don't miss the ceo of enbridge energy. all coming up on "mad money." >>> moments like this when everybody is terrified that our economy could slide back into a government induced recession next year, i got to start looking at high quality companies that are immunized ag
of a testament to america's shipbuilding prowess. they are a critical tool for the united states, for our economic security and national security when it documents arctic. you see the ice breakers mean jobs to washington state and that's why in this final package the importance of these ships, these ice breakers, the polar sea was in danger of being scrapped. there is no denying that we need to build a new icebreaker fleet for the future and for our navy arctic mission. but these specialized vessels will take up to ten years to build. so in the meantime, we want to make sure that u.s. companies can continue to do business and keep the arctic operational and running, and so it's very fitting that the icebreakers that work fine now are not dismantled. so this legislation prevents them from being scrapped and helps us have the resources that we need to serve interests in the arctic. this bill stipulates that we won't junk our current icebreakers, and it's more cost-effective to keep them, and it will make sure that they stay seaworthy so that the crews don't go out on faulty equipment. these
countries is stamped "made in america" and that's something to be proud of. something to be proud of. [cheers and applause] by the way, i hope the camera folks had a chance to take a look at some of the connects including that flag made out of connects and joe biden was in costco, he wanted to buy some of this stuff but i told him he had too much work to do. i wasn't going to have him building rollercoasters all day long. of course, santa delivers everywhere. i have been keeping my own naughty and nice list for washington. so you should keep your eye on who gets some connects this year. they're going to be some members of congress who get them and some who don't. [applause] this is a wonderful time of year. it's been a few weeks since a long election finally came to an end and obviously i couldn't be more honored to be back in the white house, but i'm already missing the time that i spent on the campaign visiting towns like this and talking to folks like you. >> we love you! >> i love you back. [cheers and applause] the benefits of traveling and getting out of the white house is it g
take a look at america by the numbers and what america looks like by the year 2016. jennifer ortman and william frey here to talk about america by the numbers. we are back in a moment. [video clip] >> punch me, straggle mae, take things from me. >> we're starting to see people coming out and talk about their experiences of this phenomenon that some have experienced and had no words for other than growing up. people were starting to stand back and say, "this is not a no part of growing up." there was a moment where there is a possibility for change. we decided to start the film out of that feeling that voices were bubbling up to the surface it to say, this is not something we can accept in our culture. >> she has gathered essays and stories together in "bully." like us on facebook. >> the white house was very controversial, as most things in america were. l'enfant designed washington city. there was a competition and he submitted the design for a palace. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly awe- inspiring. in fact, in 1821, a european diplomat told the congress
the urban vote. i love these codes. the underclass. they really are talking about america today. get used to it. those are the people that voted for president obama. americans. they're stunned because they hate obama and only talk to other republicans who also hate obama. get it? they're in this bubble and when the bubble bursts, they start to cry. >>> finally, let me finish with how the nobodies finally won, and this is "hardball," the place for politics. i always wait until the last minute. can i still ship a gift in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. by december 22nd if we want to improve our schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> wow, president oba
to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. trust duracell to power their donated toys? duralock power preserve. it locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. guaranteed. duracell with duralock. trusted everywhere. >>> growing unrest in egypt as protesters and police clash at the president palace in cairo. these images, these pictures are very powerful. >> the video we've been seeing is amazing. egyptians protesting president morsi broke through barbed wire at the palace and threw chairs and rocks at police, who in turn tossed tear gas into the crowd. the health ministry says 50 ambulances have been sent throughout cairo where hospitals are on high alert. the protests come as egyptians count down to a public referendum on a new constitution. much more to come on that. >>> in south carolina, parents who camped out for days to get first choice where they kids go to school found themselves in a stampede. thousands raced to get in line. one parent was injur
, a neighborhood with one the densest concentrations of drug addicts in north america. the portland hosts the only legal injection site in north america, a center that's come under fire from canada's conservative government. i asked dr. matÉ to talk about his patients. >> the hardcore drug addicts that i treat, but according to all studies in the states, as well, are, without exception, people who have had extraordinarily difficult lives. and the commonality is childhood abuse. in other words, these people all enter life under extremely adverse circumstances. not only did they not get what they need for healthy development, they actually got negative circumstances of neglect. i don't have a single female patient in the downtown eastside who wasn't sexually abused, for example, as were many of the men, or abused, neglected and abandoned serially, over and over again. and that's what sets up the brain biology of addiction. in other words, the addiction is related both psychologically, in terms of emotional pain relief, and neurobiological development to early adversity. >> what does the title of yo
and middle class. life will go on. just like life has gone on for the rest of the united states of america. but right now, i think the state of politics is very sad because they're seen -- there seems to be more of a game to be played and positions, one party having the upper hand over the other. not much is going to get done. and you have too many extremes on each side to make things a lot more difficult to run. and it makes it difficult on the president as well. i'm optimistic that the president got reelected, but pessimistic on anything really changing. have leased, anytime soon. -- at least, any time soon. host: and talking about actual change, if there will be a difference on january 1st or otherwise, in terms of taxes, politics, the fiscal cliff, john mckinnon, are any of these expiring? as part of our fiscal cliff series, we're looking at the bush tax cuts that are set to expire unless congress acts, and we are looking at spending cuts. our deductions on the chopping block unless congress acts? are they floating through unless they get rid of them? guest: by and large, most of them
to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. to provide a better benefits package... oahhh! [ male announcer ] it made a big splash with the employees. [ duck yelling ] [ male announcer ] find out more at... [ duck ] aflac! [ male announcer ] ...forbusiness.com. ♪ ha ha! >>> we have set sent an unmistakable message that this would cross a red line and those responsible would be held to account. >> if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> syria appears to be at a turning point. there are reports of the government preparing chemical weapons. the rebels securing the airport and more than 40,000 people dead. now some high profile senators are saying that we may have passed the point of no return. that's our focus this morning. when is enough enough? and yesterday i asked that question to a witness o
successful at cost control and private insurers have been, the great thing about america is we have everything, all possible assistance here. the veterans health administration which is true socialized medicine, the doctors are government employees, is incredibly efficient relative to the rest of the health-care system. >> you did a calculation that showed a health care system, the best in europe or france or germany, we would have no deficit in the baby boom demographics. >> everyone else -- canada is a single payer system but not socialized medicine. medicare for everybody. and is complicated. but it is a mixture of public provision, public health insurance but much heavier hand of government, the same cost as the canadian system but spectacularly good outcomes relative to anybody and britain has a system which is pure socialized medicine and the outcomes are a little better than ours. the cost is 40% better. all of these, if we were able to emulate these things we would be able -- our budget problems would be gone -- and it defies -- one of our two presidential tickets, the signa
, because the attacks on christianity in america are on the rise. jonathan morris and i will debate it tonight. >> so ann coulter was cancelled here. do you agree with that or disagree. >> definitely agree with it. >> i think her opinions are too outspoken. >> bill: fordham university saying no to ann coulter but they have allowed radical leftists to talk on campus. we sent jesse watters to find out just what is is going on. >> that's not very tolerant. i thought the university was supposed to be a place of tolerance and acceptance. >> bill: caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. hi, i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. guns, football and murder that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. as you may know, kansas city chiefs football player belcher murdered the girlfriend and mother of 3 month old daughter and then committed suicide in front of his coaches. doesn't get worse than belcher used a handgun to commit his crimes there are many aspects to this case. bob costas brought one of them into the arena last night.
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